Carnival of Journalism

Advice for student news media: Be radically experimental!

It’s back! The Carnival of Journalism. Hip, hip, hooray! Huh?! The Carnival is a monthly online gabfest of (mostly) journalists who all agree to answer a common question, usually related to the future of journalism, on their respective blogs. It’s being resurrected by David Cohn, a.k.a. DigiDave, after a break. (There were other breaks before…

Boulder flooding

Disaster news coverage will be much better in a few years

Boulder, Colorado, and surrounding towns were hit recently with days of record rainfall, history-making flooding, and epic damage. The destruction covered larger towns like Boulder and Longmont, and was truly horrific in mountain towns like Jamestown and Lyons. I was in the middle of this (i.e., getting rained on like everyone else), but my family’s…

Dangerous idea: Embrace journalistic algorithms! #jcarn

My poor blog gets neglected, but fortunately there’s the monthly Carnival of Journalism thought-fest, which I try to participate in every month, if possible. At least the Carnival prevents me from completely ignoring my blog! This month’s Carnival prompt is a fascinating one. Put forth by University of Southern California professor Andrew Lih and his…

Can good journalist + good capitalist = possible?

This month’s Carnival of Journalism, hosted by Michael Rosenbaum, asks the provocative question: “Can a good journalist also be a good capitalist?” I’ll probably open myself up to charges of being “ageist,” but here goes… Working at a university journalism program (University of Colorado Boulder), I’ve come to the conclusion that the next generation of…

carnival

In defense of shiny new digital things (#jcarn)

For this month’s Carnival of Journalism (Twitter hashtag #jcarn), Lisa Williams is leading the show, and she has this question: “Right now, nominations are open for the Online Journalism Awards. What qualities should awards like this endorse in an era of such tremendous change in the news industry?” I’m a bit late, so I’ve had…

What universities can do for journalism: Innovate!

Thanks to the enthusiasm of David Cohn, a.k.a DigiDave, the Carnival of Journalism has been resurrected. Somehow I missed participating the first time around several years ago, but with a name like that it must be fun, right? So I’m in this time. The Carnival revolves around a monthly topic, with a bunch of smart…

How could journalists disagree with Assange?

Julian Assange, Wikileaks founder, during a Democracy Now interview: “We have clearly stated motives, but they are not antiwar motives. We are not pacifists. We are transparency activists who understand that transparent government tends to produce just government. And that is our sort of modus operandi behind our whole organization, is to get out suppressed…

Farewell, E&P: The last of my 14-1/2 years of columns

After writing a column for Editor & Publisher Online for so long (it was my “Stop The Presses!” column that served as the website’s main original content at the very beginning), it feels weird to have the final one published. But it’s online, “Goodbye, for Now: Looking Foward.” (My editors rejected my apparently too-controversial suggested…

Downie-Schudson: Who are they writing for?

Reading the new report by Len Downie Jr. and Professor Michael Schudson, “The Reconstruction of American Journalism,” today, I kept wondering: Who is this report aimed at? Commissioned by the Journalism School at Columbia University, the 96-page report offers nothing much new to media geeks. If you follow the news industry and its travails closely,…

Feeling a bit better after Aspen conference

This week I was lucky enough to participate in an Aspen Institute conference, “Of the Press: Models for Preserving American Journalism.” The participants were an all-star bunch, including Madeleine Albright (a journalist before becoming a diplomat) for day 1, Washington Post executive editor Marcus Brauchli, Marissa Mayer of Google, Craig Newmark of Craigslist, Federal Trade…

Isn’t it about time to expose the hypocrites?

I’ve been away for a few days, but when I got back I caught up on some episodes I’d missed of the Daily Show and Colbert Report during the Republican convention. Jon Stewart hit it particularly well by comparing past and recent statements by folks like Karl Rove and Fox News TV pundit Bill O’Reilly….

Tweetscan: journalistic tool

I just discovered Tweetscan, which is a cool little service that aggregates Twitter posts for user-selected topics. You can go to the site and type in a search term, then see recent tweets (that’s what you call Twitter posts) that include your term. Jeff Jarvis noted this over the weekend and used the example of…